Whole or Processed Food: Which is Best?

The common suggestion to shop the circumference of the grocery store can be helpful if you are trying to decrease your processed food intake, but that doesn’t mean foods in the aisles are unhealthy.

Many diets today promote the intake of only whole foods, but let’s be real. In today’s busy world, convenience foods can be extremely helpful and can have just as much nutritional value if you choose wisely.

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Add Plant Protein to Your Diet

As a dietitian, I would never encourage everyone to go strictly vegan or vegetarian. Many people enjoy meat, and that is okay, but research shows that a reduction in animal protein (beef, pork, lamb and processed meats in particular) can improve health, including a reduction in cardiovascular disease, prevention or better management of diabetes, and reduced risk of cancer.

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Turkey Burgers

Turkey burgers are a great alternative to beef as they have less saturated fat and calories.  Place this burger on a whole grain hamburger bun, add some fresh tomatoes, red onion and dark leafy greens like arugula or spinach for added vitamins and minerals.  Pair this burger with a side salad and some juicy fruit for a well-balanced meal. 

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Shelf-Stable Foods

As difficult as this time is, it is important for all of us to stay home as much as possible to stop the spread of the Coronavirus and protect those most vulnerable.

Buying more shelf-stable foods is one way to reduce grocery store trips. Here is a list of healthy whole foods to have on hand:

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Discover Mindful Eating

So when did it happen? Or has it always been that way? The fact that following a delicious meal, we rarely remember the flavors, aromas and senses stimulated by a flavorful meal. Instead we often feel overfull, possibly to the point of discomfort.

Sound like the aftermath of your holiday meal? You’re not alone.

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Talking Turkey

We’ve all heard that the turkey in our Thanksgiving meal makes us sleepy. The theory comes from the fact that turkey contains the amino acid tryptophan that can be converted into several important substances, including serotonin and the hormone melatonin, a popular sleep aid.

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